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Tips on relocating to a different country with your pets - State to State Movers

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Moving along with your pets can be quite the hassle sometimes, no matter whether you have a dog, a cat or an exotic pets. Pets are very territorial and hate having to change their habitat. This is why relocation can be so stressful for them, especially for cats. However, there are certain steps that you can take in order to make the whole relocation process easier for them and less anxiety-inducing. Let’s begin by assuming that you and your family, along with your furry friend, will be moving somewhere outside of the United States. This means that you will most certainly have to travel by airplane. Before you can fly with your pet, there are certain things that you need to take care of first. State to State Movers have compiled this comprehensive guide about moving with pets, with all the necessary steps you need to take in order to ensure a smooth relocation to your new home. You will need several things before you can fly with your pet and you will also need to research certain information about the country you’ll be moving to. Let’s begin.

Step No.1: Make sure that you check the country’s policy on importing pets

 

Certain countries in Europe and all across the globe have prohibited certain dog breeds from entering the country or being held as a pet. This is because they wanted to reduce the number of incidents caused by bites or other types of trauma from the dog. This does not apply to cats. Here’s a list of some of the countries and the dog breeds they have prohibited:

*Note: This list does NOT contain all of the countries which prohibit certain dog breeds. Research the information on the official government website of the country.

Poland

  •         Pitbull Terrier (allowed only with effective precautions)

Germany

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         American Staffordshire Terrier
  •         Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  •         English Bull Terrier

Denmark

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         American Staffordshire Terrier
  •         American Bulldog
  •         Alabai
  •         Tosa Inu
  •         Kangal
  •         Caucasian Shepherd Dog
  •         Tornjak
  •         Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff)
  •         South-Russian Shepherd
  •         Yugoslavian Shepherd Dog
  •         Mixes and hybrids of these breeds

Spain

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         American Staffordshire Terrier
  •         Dogo Argentino
  •         English Bull Terrier
  •         Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  •         Rottweiler
  •         Akita inu
  •         Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff)
  •         Tosa Inu

Great Britain

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         Dogo Argentino
  •         Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff)
  •         Tosa Inu

Ireland

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         English Bull Terrier
  •         Akita Inu
  •         Bullmastiff
  •         Doberman Pinscher
  •         Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  •         German Shepherd Dog
  •         Rhodesian Ridgeback

 

Source: https://petolog.com/articles/banned-dogs.html

 

Step No. 2: Make sure you have ALL of the necessary documentation for your pet

You will not be allowed to enter the airport or board the plane with your pet unless you provide the airport staff with this information. However, you should know that not all airlines will demand the same types of documents. Certain airlines do not allow pets on board at all, so make sure you double check this information before you buy the tickets.

The documents which are usually required for presentation include:

Rabies tags – the majority of countries requires your pet to be regularly vaccinated against rabies. This includes cats, dogs and specific exotic animals. Check online if your pet needs this vaccination or not.

Permits – these can be easily obtained at your chosen vet. They are already familiar with the procedure, so it shouldn’t take long to obtain these permits. Schedule a visit to your vet before you buy your plane tickets.

Health certificates – most airlines will not allow pets which are sick or have some other issue on board. These health certificated can also be obtained at your local vet, so schedule a visit for both the permits and health certificates. Make sure that you absolutely need them before you schedule your appointment, in order to avoid wasting any time or money.

Step No. 3: Make sure that you check which airlines allow pets on board

Nowadays, the majority of airlines allow pets on board. However, certain low-cost carriers might not allow pets at all, so make sure you double check this information before you buy your tickets. This is absolutely crucial, as you wouldn’t want to have to leave your pet behind once you’re supposed to fly to your new home. Certain airlines will provide you with a pet carrier which you’ll be able to take with you into the cabin. However, if you have a larger animal, such as a dog, they will have to stay in the cargo area.

 

Step No. 4: Visit your vet before you start moving

If your pets is due for shots or has a chronic disorder or illness, it would be a good idea to visit the vet right before your relocation date. If your pet has any type of prescription medication make sure that your vet writes that down on a separate document so that you can get a refill at any time. Also, refill your prescription medication before your relocation. This is essential because you can never know whether you’ll be able to find the medication your pet needs or not.

 

Here’s the complete list of the documents you will need for your pet to be able to travel with you:

  •         Vaccination & any other Health Certificates – This can be easily obtained at your local vet office. Schedule a visit before your relocation date.
  •         Microchip – Certain countries require your pet to be microchipped. Make sure you get that sorted out before you depart. Keep in mind that this process can be quite painful for your pet, so it would be a good idea to get that sorted out much before you relocation starts.

·         ID tags – Your pet should wear a collar with an ID tag! This will ensure that your pet doesn’t get lost in the airport or during transportation.